Mexico’s Midterm Elections See Record Number of LGBTQ+ Candidates

By Fátima Vargas-López

Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico

Maria Clemente, a candidate for deputy for the MORENA party, poses with a transgender pride flag at a political event (Photo Credit: NBC News)

With multiple scandals surrounding candidates from the leading party, MORENA, many Mexican voters were more cautious in deciding who to cast their ballots for. With midterm elections looming, the fight for representation persisted for what many believe will be one of the most consequential elections in Mexico’s history.


On Sunday, Mexicans were called to vote for the 500 federal deputies, fifteen governorships and about 1,900 mayoralties across the country. This election could shift the current representation imbalance across the country, as over 50% of deputies are held by the same party. Additionally, more people of different backgrounds, identities and trajectories have decided to run for office. The National Electoral Institute (INE) noticed the lack of diversity in candidates and has since implemented regulations mandating that “political parties to nominate indigenous, disabled, Afro-Mexican, migrant and sexually diverse people,” according to electoral advisor Adriana Favela.


In the past few months, young people have become more vocal in their beliefs and have started advocating for social progress in Mexico; this has been demonstrated in the fight of women’s rights activists and LGBTQ+ activists demanding equality. This election, there is a record-breaking number of LGBTQ+ candidates running for different posts in the Mexican government. Over 100 candidates are advocating for LGBTQ+ rights. Among them are Juan Pablo Delgado, the first openly gay candidate for the mayoralty of his town, León, Guanajuato, and Roshell Terranova, a transgender activist for over fifteen years and candidate for the fourth circumscription.


Many believe that increasing the diversity in government will encourage young activists to continue advocating.